Daily News, via SOTT.net aggregation.

Facebook's Zuckerberg says there 'clearly was bias' in controversy over 'censorship' of pro-life group Live Action

Facebook's Zuckerberg says there 'clearly was bias' in controversy over 'censorship' of pro-life group Live Action

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said the company's handling of a fact-checking controversy involving pro-life group Live Action was biased. The embattled tech executive discussed the issue during a meeting on Thursday with Missouri Sen. Josh Hawley, a frequent critic of Big Tech, on a host of topics, including privacy and allegations of anti-conservative discrimination. "Zuckerberg admitted there "clearly was bias" in the @LiveAction @LilaGraceRose censorship. Said bias is 'an issue we've struggled with for a long time.'" tweeted Hawley, one of several senators who questioned the tech company's fact-checking systems in a letter to Zuckerberg last week.

Pit bull terrier kills 13-month-old boy in Granite Bay, California

Pit bull terrier kills 13-month-old boy in Granite Bay, California

A 13-month-old boy was killed Friday after being attacked by a family pet, the Placer County Sheriff's Office said. "It was just a horrible tragedy and our heart goes out to the family," said Lt. Andrew Scott. "I can't imagine what they're going through at this moment." The boy was mauled by the family pit bull at a home in Granite Bay around 3 p.m., officials said. The dog attack appeared to have been unprovoked. "The adult was with the baby when the attack occurred and didn't appear to hint at anything that the attack was coming," Scott said. "Sometimes, they're not preventable and our investigation appears that is the case."

Houthis offer Saudi Arabia mutual halt to attacks - "We stop, you stop" - UPDATE: Saudis respond they'll 'wait and see'

Houthis offer Saudi Arabia mutual halt to attacks - "We stop, you stop" - UPDATE: Saudis respond they'll 'wait and see'

Yemen's Houthi rebels have announced a halt on strikes against Saudi Arabia, adding that they expect reciprocal steps from Riyadh. The ceasefire offer comes days after a major attack on Saudi oil refineries claimed by the Houthis. The televised announcement was made on Friday by Mahdi al-Mashat, head of the Houthi political council in Sana'a. It comes as the Saudi-led coalition launched a massive operation against "legitimate military targets" north of the port of Hodeidah, in southwestern Yemen. "I call on all parties from different sides of the war to engage seriously in genuine negotiations that can lead to a comprehensive national reconciliation that does not exclude anyone," said Mashat. If the Saudis ignore the ceasefire offer and continue bombing, the group reserves its "right to respond," he warned. This is not the first instance of Houthis making a ceasefire gesture to try and stop the Saudi bombing campaign - but this time they appear to have some added leverage. The...

Ancient viruses could help kill cancers

Ancient viruses could help kill cancers

DNA "echoes" of viruses that infected our ancestors millions of years ago could help the immune system to identify and kill cancer cells, according to new research from Crick scientists. The new study, published in Genome Research, looked at "endogenous retroviruses," fragments of DNA in the human genome that were left behind by viruses that infected our ancestors. Over millions of years, our ancestors were infected with countless viruses and their DNA now makes up more of our genome than human genes. Approximately 8 percent of the human genome is made up of retroviral DNA, while known genes only make up 1-2 percent.

Israel is the killer state at large

Israel is the killer state at large

The most important news coming out of occupied Palestine in the past week was not the blow delivered to Benyamin Netanyahu. Netanyahu or Gantz, it will be business as usual, now that the elections are over: more attacks on Gaza, possibly a large-scale war on Gaza, possibly a war on Lebanon, or Iran, who would know, as Israel always has a profusion of targets. No, the most important news was not the elections but the killing of a Palestinian woman on the west bank, only a few days after a 10-year-old boy, Abd al Rahman Yassir Shtewi, had been shot in the head by a soldier near the northern West Bank village of Kafr Qaddum during a demonstration over the closure of an access road. He was taken to hospital in critical condition. The woman, Alaa Wahdan, was shot with an assault rifle as she walked towards a checkpoint near the Qalandiya refugee camp, built for refugees after the massacres and ethnic cleansing of Palestinians from Lydda and Ramle in 1948.

Hong Kong protesters vandalize train station, hurl firebombs as police deploy tear gas to stop riot

Hong Kong protesters vandalize train station, hurl firebombs as police deploy tear gas to stop riot

Hong Kong police have fired tear gas at protesters, who vandalized a train station, erected barricades and started fires, in the latest anti-Beijing demonstration there this weekend. The Chinese city is enduring its 16th consecutive week of street protests, which initially were aimed at blocking a controversial extradition law but which have continued long after that legislation was dropped. On Saturday thousands of protesters gathered in Tuen Mun, a satellite town located in the New Territories. Some surreal footage was filmed in the small town, showing activists cowering behind a barricade they'd erected and were hurling bricks by the dozen -and some petrol bombs- with no law enforcement even close.

'Powerful states' blocking information on companies cashing in on illegal Israeli settlements

'Powerful states' blocking information on companies cashing in on illegal Israeli settlements

Amnesty International is urging UN member states to use the next Human Rights Council session on Palestine to demand the release of a database of companies operating in the illegal Israeli settlements. In a new report published on Friday, the rights organisation stressed that the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) has repeatedly delayed publication of the database, despite initial plans to release it in March 2017 itself. "It has become increasingly clear that the delay is in part because certain states are bringing extensive political pressure to bear, not just to put off the database's release, but to stop it being made public at all," said the report.

Week 45: Undaunted pianist plays on as riot police pursue Yellow Vests through Paris train station

Week 45: Undaunted pianist plays on as riot police pursue Yellow Vests through Paris train station

Yellow Vest protesters seeking respite from tear gas in a Paris train station were accompanied by an unexpected live soundtrack as a talented pianist played on nearby, undeterred by the melée around him. Playing on a public piano, the musician added a dreamlike quality to the tense situation.

Photos of damage to Saudis' Khurais oil field show strikes seem "suspiciously well-placed"- Did Houthis have 'insider help'?

Photos of damage to Saudis' Khurais oil field show strikes seem "suspiciously well-placed"- Did Houthis have 'insider help'?

Much of the attention concerning the crippling damage to Saudi Aramco facilities struck in last week's aerial attack ultimately blamed on "Iranian sponsorship" by US and Saudi officials has focused on Abqaiq processing plant, but on Friday the first on the ground images from the kingdom's giant Khurais oil field — the country's second largest — have been revealed, showing scorched infrastructure, ruptured pipelines, and "a mess of oil melted to asphalt, twisted and charred metal grates" according to an on site Bloomberg report. And yet Aramco has remained insistent that the field will return to pre-attack output levels this month, after the company reported losing half its daily output in the aftermath of the early Saturday attacks, impacting a whopping 5% of total global supply.

Hillary Clinton: It was Wisconsin! Voter purge deprived her of her presidency

Hillary Clinton: It was Wisconsin! Voter purge deprived her of her presidency

It's been nearly three years since she lost the 2016 election, but former Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton just can't let go. She once again has tried to cast her loss as a signal that American democracy is in danger instead of soberly weighing the weaknesses of her own campaign, which failed to mobilize voters. "You can get the nomination; you can win the popular vote; and you can lose the Electoral College - and therefore the election - for these four reasons," former Secretary of State Clinton said Tuesday at the American Federation of Teachers Shanker Institute Defense of Democracy Forum at The George Washington University. "Number One: Voter suppression." Clinton said: "Experts estimate that anywhere from 27,000 to 200,000 Wisconsin citizen voters, predominantly in Milwaukee, were turned away from the polls. That's a lot of potential voters. They showed up, but maybe they didn't have the correct form of identification. Maybe the name on their driver's license...

Rep. Meadows: Comey's congressional testimony doesn't jive with what he told IG Horowitz, requires new referral

Rep. Meadows: Comey's congressional testimony doesn't jive with what he told IG Horowitz, requires new referral

The DOJ Inspector General's work is never done. Just last month IG Horowitz released a report which concluded that former FBI Director James Comey violated bureau policy by treating official records as if they were his personal documents. Today, Horowitz testified before Congress and was asked by Rep. Mark Meadows about some apparent discrepancies between what Comey told the IG during that investigation and what Comey had said during congressional testimony last year. Rep. Meadows said a referral would be forthcoming and Horowitz agreed to look over the information. "We've taken, now, your report and we've put it side-by-side [with] congressional testimony that James Comey made before the joint oversight and judiciary hearing and I'm finding just a number of irregularities," Meadows said. He continued, "So would it be appropriate if ranking member Jordan and I were to refer those inconsistencies to the IG and if we did that would the IG look at those inconsistencies?" "It's...

Syria: Drone loaded with cluster bombs intercepted

Syria: Drone loaded with cluster bombs intercepted

According to the Syrian Arab News Agency, special services dismantled the drone, which they managed to detect and shoot down north of the city of Al Qunaitra. The Syrian Army has intercepted a drone loaded with cluster bombs over Jebel al-Sheikh near the Golan Heights, the Syrian Arab News Agency said on Saturday. ​The incident comes two days after another drone interception over the Damascus suburb of Aqraba. In addition, Syrian intelligence agencies discovered a stash of weapons, ammunition, medicine, food, and equipment produced in Israel, in the village of Barika in the suburbs of Quneitra. ​

A third of American workers' pay is stolen...here's how

A third of American workers' pay is stolen...here's how

If you're a member of the working class, 1/3 of your pay has been stolen from you. You would think this would be front page news every day until the problem is fixed. Not only is that a huge amount of money for a huge portion of the country, but you would expect our left leaning media to be all over this. There is no better evidence that capitalism, at least in its current state, is failing. If the left actually cared about the working class, if the wave of cultural Marxism that has spread through academia and the media was actually about the plight of workers oppressed by a distant and uncaring elite, no fact would be repeated more often than this. And yet, aside from a handful of articles - such as one from the New York Times in 2011, and another from The Atlantic in 2015 - the issue hardly gets mentioned by the media. And even when it is mentioned, it is often editorialized in a way that distorts the problem and hides its root cause, if not outright lied about by a media with an...

Cuba: Diplomats' mysterious illnesses may have been a neurotoxin used in fumigation for Zika carrying mosquitos

Cuba: Diplomats' mysterious illnesses may have been a neurotoxin used in fumigation for Zika carrying mosquitos

Fumigation against mosquitoes in Cuba and not "sonic attacks" may have caused some 40 U.S. and Canadian diplomats and family members in Havana to fall ill, according to a new study commissioned by the Canadian government. The incidents took place from late 2016 into 2018, causing the administration of U.S. President Donald Trump to charge that diplomats were attacked by some sort of secret weapon. Canada has refrained from such charges. The United States in 2017 reduced its embassy staff to a minimum and Canada followed more recently, citing the incidents and the danger posed to staff from what has become known as the "Havana Syndrome." Various scientific studies have yet to identify the cause of the diplomats' cognitive ailments, ranging from dizziness and blurred vision to memory loss and difficulty concentrating. The Canadian study by a team of researchers affiliated with the Brain Repair Centre at Dalhousie University and the Nova Scotia Health Authority studied Canadian...

Trump again threatens to dump captured ISIS fighters on Europe's doorstep

Trump again threatens to dump captured ISIS fighters on Europe's doorstep

The US president has repeatedly criticised Germany, France, and other European countries whose citizens joined the Islamist terrorist group, fought in the Middle East, and were captured, for their reluctance to take them back. As the complicated issue remains unresolved, he resumed his threats to release the alleged jihadists. US President Donald Trump has threatened to set prisoners from Europe who joined Daesh in Syria and Iraq free at the EU's borders if they refuse to take back the captives. According to the American commander-in-chief, after the US defeated the so-called caliphate, Washington has "thousands of prisoners of war, ISIS fighters" who are European nationals, but these countries are refusing to cooperate. He singled out France and Germany when speaking on the matter. "We're asking the countries from which they came, from Europe, we're asking them to take back these prisoners of war. And they can try them, do what they want. So far, they've refused. And at some...

13 US Marines charged in human smuggling case

13 US Marines charged in human smuggling case

Thirteen Marines have been formally charged with playing a role in the smuggling of undocumented immigrants into the U.S., the Marine Corps announced Friday. In addition to the smuggling charges, the Marines will face military court proceedings for charges including failure to obey an order, drunkenness, endangerment, larceny and perjury, according to a statement from the 1st Marine Division Press Office. Two of the Marines were specifically named -- Lance Cpls. Byron Law and David Salazar-Quintero -- but the other names were withheld. These two have also been charged federally with transporting and conspiring to transport illegal immigrants into the country for financial gain. Both were based at Camp Pendleton, in California. According to a criminal complaint filed in July, Border Patrol agents were making normal rounds when they saw a black car pull off the road around seven miles north of the U.S.-Mexico border. They pulled the vehicle over and found Law driving and...

Dutch court: War crimes accusations against Israeli Benny Gantz presented

Dutch court: War crimes accusations against Israeli Benny Gantz presented

As Israelis went to the polls on Tuesday, one of the leading candidates for prime minister was fending off war crimes accusations in a court in The Hague. Palestinian-Dutch citizen Ismail Ziada is seeking justice for Israel's killing of six members of his family during its 2014 assault on Gaza. Ziada holds Benny Gantz, the Israeli army chief at the time, and Amir Eshel, then the air force chief, responsible for the decision to bomb his family's home in al-Bureij refugee camp. The 20 July bombing that year reduced the three-floor building to rubble, killing Ziada's 70-year-old mother Muftia Ziada, his brothers Jamil, Yousif and Omar, sister-in-law Bayan, and 12-year-old nephew Shaban. A seventh person visiting the family was also killed. Ziada is suing the Israeli generals for more than $600,000 in damages plus court costs. Gantz is now leader of Israel's Blue and White coalition. After this week's inconclusive election result, he is seeking the support of other parties to put...

A 2M no-show! Area 51 raid flops! Group of YouTubers chat up guards instead

A 2M no-show! Area 51 raid flops! Group of YouTubers chat up guards instead

A viral prank that promised to see two million alien hunters breach the gates of Area 51 has ended with a whimper instead of a bang, drawing only a few dozen enthusiasts for the much-anticipated 'raid.' Initially a mock Facebook event, "Storm Area 51" quickly became a phenomenon that garnered interest from hundreds of thousands of netizens, who signed up to blaze past police and military guards to "see them aliens" at the top-secret Nevada facility. Some celebrities who'd promised to join in heated up the memeful event even more, while the authorities tried to pour cold water on even the idea of a peaceful alien-themed festival, calling it unsustainable. So what epic action unfolded in the middle of the Nevada desert on Friday morning as the pulled-in reinforcements readied their rifles and K9 guards stood poised at the perimeter? Well, you guessed it - none of it.

Rethinking Out of Africa: New study suggests ancient hominins in Asia 500k earlier than previously thought

Rethinking Out of Africa: New study suggests ancient hominins in Asia 500k earlier than previously thought

Giancarlo Scardia was in Jordan in 2013 as the Syrian Civil War ground on. He recalls seeing refugees gathered in giant camps and military aircraft moving toward the border. But Scardia, a geologist based at São Paulo State University in Brazil, wasn't there to observe the conflict — his interest was in a much older story. Buried within layers of sediment in the Zarqa Valley in northern Jordan was a large cache of chipped rocks. Scardia and his colleagues, having analyzed these artifacts, argue that they are rudimentary tools used by early humans, crafted and discarded around 2.5 million years ago. If they are right, we may need to rethink which hominin species made the first forays out of the African cradle — and when. The general consensus for decades has been that Homo erectus — an upright, long-legged species — was among the first hominins (or species closely related to modern humans) to leave Africa. Scientists presume members of this species traveled through the natural...

New York bans unvaccinated children from public schools

New York bans unvaccinated children from public schools

Under a new law that just went into effect in New York, children who were not vaccinated on religious grounds will no longer be permitted to attend public elementary schools in the state. The new law, which was passed in June and took effect on Friday, gave parents of unvaccinated children a 14-day deadline from the start of the school year to show they had taken steps to give their children at least the first age-appropriate dose in each required immunization, such as the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine.

Adapt 2030 Ice Age Report: Global lock down begins as food shortages loom

Adapt 2030 Ice Age Report: Global lock down begins as food shortages loom

With the unavoidable crop loss reality and rising food prices because of the largest floods in American history, suddenly the Saudi Arabia oil refinery goes off line for six months during harvest season. This in my opinion will be used to explain away runaway food & agricultural commodities prices. Sources

Teen's bizarre sudden-onset schizophrenia & hallucinations caused by something millions of us own

Teen's bizarre sudden-onset schizophrenia & hallucinations caused by something millions of us own

In 2015, a 14-year-old patient developed rapid-onset schizophrenia with hallucinations, thoughts of suicide and homicide. He also believed his cat was trying to kill him, which was closer to the truth than you might think. His pet cat was not, in fact, a homicidal maniac but it did harbor the pathogen Bartonella henselae, which is associated with 'cat scratch disease.' This bacterium is typically found in cat blood, particularly that of kittens, and just one bite or scratch can be enough to transmit the pathogen to humans, causing localized swelling and lesions, in addition to issues in the heart and nervous system. Now, according to new research by scientists at North Carolina State University, in extremely rare cases, 'cat scratch disease' may also induce extreme schizophrenia. The unnamed patient developed psychiatric symptoms in 2015, claiming to be the "damned son of the devil" while experiencing violent outbursts and suspecting that the family cat was trying to kill him.

Woman who cries crystals instead of tears baffles doctors

Woman who cries crystals instead of tears baffles doctors

An Armenian woman whose eyes weep crystal-like discharges instead of watery tears has left doctors baffled by the bizarre and painful condition, according to local reports. Satenik Karazian, 22, from the Shirak region, started experiencing symptoms two months ago. Initially, she'd thought she got some dust in her eyes at the dentist, then her family suspected it was a shard of glass.

Adapt 2030 Ice Age Report: The real public perception of changing climate

Adapt 2030 Ice Age Report: The real public perception of changing climate

New initiatives in California, Massachusetts, and Washington State or ban gas stoves and heating in residential and commercial buildings. A look at public perception of how people on the street feel about humans causing all of the climate change we are seeing. Solar cycle declines since SC 20 downward, how strange will our climate become? Sources

Not a free speech platform: Facebook declares it's a 'publisher' & can censor whomever it wants, walks right into legal trap

Not a free speech platform: Facebook declares it's a 'publisher' & can censor whomever it wants, walks right into legal trap

Facebook has invoked its free speech right as a publisher, insisting its ability to smear users as extremists is protected, but its legal immunity thus far has rested on a law which protects platforms, not publishers. Which is it? Facebook has declared it has the right, as a publisher, to exercise its own free speech and bar conservative political performance artist Laura Loomer from its platform. Even calling her a dangerous extremist is allowed under the First Amendment, because it's merely an opinion, Facebook claims in its motion to dismiss the lawsuit filed by Loomer. But Facebook has always defined itself as a tech company providing a platform for users' speech in the past, a definition that has come to appear increasingly ridiculous in the era of widespread politically-motivated censorship. Now, the not-so-neutral content platform has redefined itself as a publisher equipped with a whole new set of rights, but bereft of the protections that have kept it safe from legal...

Jeffrey Epstein paid doctors to medicate 'sex slaves' with tranquilizers

Jeffrey Epstein paid doctors to medicate 'sex slaves' with tranquilizers

Victims of Jeffery Epstein said multimillionaire financier and convicted pedophile paid doctors and psychiatrists to prescribe them tranquilizers and anti-depressants. Virginia Giuffre, who was recruited by Epstein at the age of 16, told the Miami Herald that doctors prescribed her Xanax for the three years, as well as several other victims through recommended doctors. "There were doctors and psychiatrists and gynecologist visits. There were dentists who whitened our teeth," she told the newspaper. "There was a doctor who gave me Xanax. What doctor in their right mind, who is supposed to protect their patients, gives girls and young women Xanax?" Sarah Ransome, who was 22 when she was trafficked by Epstein from her native South Africa, said she was taken to a psychiatrist and prescribed Lithium while being on the verge of a mental breakdown.

No one likes Chelsea Handler's Netflix screed on 'white privilege' - savaged by critics and audiences alike

No one likes Chelsea Handler's Netflix screed on 'white privilege' - savaged by critics and audiences alike

Chelsea Handler's Netflix documentary on white privilege - Hello, Privilege. It's Me, Chelsea - has been panned by critics, who say it amounts to a "misguided reckoning" and note that she is actively "exploiting her wokeness" and "profiting off a film about her white privilege." Handler's Netflix special, which dropped last week, centers around the left-wing comedienne's exploration of "white privilege" in an attempt to "be a better white person to people of color, without making it a thing." "I'm clearly the beneficiary of white privilege. And I want to know what my personal responsibility is moving forward in the world we live in today where race is concerned," Handler says in the documentary. However, the documentary has not been well received, with critics pointing out that she is, in fact, benefiting from white privilege by participating in a "white privilege" documentary and ultimately making money from the project.

If NATO is stupid enough to strike Kaliningrad, they will lose Baltic States in less than 48 hours

If NATO is stupid enough to strike Kaliningrad, they will lose Baltic States in less than 48 hours

Russia will not wait for the United States to launch an attack on the Kaliningrad enclave. The General Staff of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation have preventive measures not to let this happen, military expert Mikhail Alexandrov believes. US Air Force Operations Commander in Europe, General Jeffrey Harrigian, said that the United States had a plan to break through air defense of Russia's Kaliningrad enclave in Europe. According to The National Interest, a B-52 bomber of the US Air Force practiced an attack on the Kaliningrad region in March of this year. Does Russia have similar plans?

Israeli agression, social stigmas contribute to Palestine's growing suicide epidemic

Israeli agression, social stigmas contribute to Palestine's growing suicide epidemic

A recent report showed that cases of suicide in Palestine have increased by 14 percent and there are many complex reasons behind this harrowing statistic. For decades, Palestinians have been at the face of violence in the Middle East. They endured being expelled and murdered during a mass exodus in the late 1940s, to being subject to brutal occupations, sieges and forced into refugee camps under abhorrent conditions. It's no secret that the creation of Israel has stunted and even deteriorated Palestinian development. First hand violence isn't the only form of aggression Palestinians face - as conditions for Palestinians worsen, more people in the occupied territories are resorting to taking their own lives.

Google reportedly builds first quantum computer

Google reportedly builds first quantum computer

Google's new quantum computer reportedly spends mere minutes on the tasks the world's top supercomputers would need several millennia to perform. The media found out about this after NASA "accidentally" shared the firm's research. The software engineers at Google have built the world's most powerful computer, the Financial Times and Fortune magazine reported on Friday, citing the company's now-removed research paper. The paper is said to have been posted on a website hosted by NASA, which partners with Google, but later quietly taken down, without explanation. Google and NASA have refused to comment on the matter. A source within the IT giant, however, told Fortune that NASA had "accidentally" published the paper before its team could verify its findings.

Facebook blocks tens of thousands of apps hoarding your data, admits 'won't catch everything'

Facebook blocks tens of thousands of apps hoarding your data, admits 'won't catch everything'

Facebook has suspended tens of thousands of apps for improperly using users' personal information - orders of magnitude larger than the 400 they'd previously acknowledged - but they've promised to do better next time. Again. Some 69,000 apps were suspended by Facebook for potentially slurping up users' personal info without their knowledge or consent, according to a court filing unsealed in Boston on Friday. While 59,000 of those ended up on the chopping block merely because their developers refused to comply with Facebook's investigation, 10,000 set off alarm bells for the likelihood they misappropriated data, according to the documents, whose release triggered a damage-control blog post from the company. The apps were suspended "for a variety of reasons," Facebook pleaded - they weren't necessarily "posing a threat to people." Wherever the company found wrongdoing - such as a pair of apps that infected users' phones with malware in a lucrative fraud scheme - they insist they've...

Susan Crockford: No climate emergency for polar bears

Susan Crockford: No climate emergency for polar bears

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Trump deploys reinforcements to Persian Gulf to defend 'American oil' and other assets, not US allies

Trump deploys reinforcements to Persian Gulf to defend 'American oil' and other assets, not US allies

The US is sending reinforcements to Saudi Arabia and UAE to protect what it believes to be its own assets, and put additional pressure on Iran, increasing the risk of a sudden and devastating regional war, analysts told RT. ​The Persian Gulf is a powder keg, and any aggressive action by the Saudis or any other regional player "could trigger some sort of conflict that draws the US in" - but Americans are unlikely to fall in line with yet another war, especially to defend such a repugnant ally, Colin Cavell, associate professor of political science at Bluefield State College, told RT. Washington is putting itself in a "very tenuous situation" and even though it will likely try to sell potential war with the usual line that they're "fighting for freedom and democracy," Cavell warned "there's a pretty widespread feeling among US troops that that's not the case." "The US is trying to protect what it considers to be their oil, their strategic lifeline."

Tony Heller: My gift to climate alarmists

Tony Heller: My gift to climate alarmists

This is my most concise expose of climate fraud. Please pass it around to everyone you know and your elected officials. The video is short, but cuts right to the heart of the matter.

Mysterious magnetic pulses and evidence of groundwater discovered on Mars

Mysterious magnetic pulses and evidence of groundwater discovered on Mars

Mars may be hiding water deep beneath its surface, NASA's InSight lander has discovered - and the planet's magnetic field has a life of its own, pulsing at the stroke of midnight in a manner utterly unlike anything found on Earth. There may be liquid water on Mars after all - dozens of miles inside the planet, according to magnetic measurements from the InSight lander, which has been exploring Mars since landing in November. The probe's magnetometer seems to register an electrically conductive layer up to 62 miles beneath the surface, appearing similar to how water deep within the Earth appears using terrestrial magnetometers. Unfortunately for would-be Martian colonists eager to find out whether there really is water down there, InSight can only drill 16 feet beneath the surface, leaving a potential oasis woefully out of reach.

Why the Swiss are rebelling against 5G rollout

Why the Swiss are rebelling against 5G rollout

Switzerland was among the first countries to begin deploying 5G, but health fears over radiation from the antennas that carry the next-generation mobile technology have sparked a nationwide revolt. Demonstrators against the technology are due to fill the streets of Bern later this month, but already a number of cantons have been pressured to put planned constructions of 5G-compatible antennae on ice. The technology has been swept up in the deepening trade war between China and the United States, which has tried to rein in Chinese giant Huawei - the world's leader in superfast 5G equipment - over fears it will allow Beijing to spy on communications from countries that use its products and services.

Fresh snow covers Utah's Alta

Fresh snow covers Utah's Alta

Fresh snow covered Alta in Little Cottonwood Canyon on Friday. According to KSL meteorologist Grant Wayman, the storm that brought widespread rain to the Salt Lake Valley is expected to dump 1 to 3 inches of snow at high elevations. The sun is expected to show itself Saturday, with highs in the upper 60s. Temperatures are then expected to climb into the mid-70s Sunday and well into the workweek.

'I just wanted the day off': School children admit they used climate change protests as an excuse to skip class

'I just wanted the day off': School children admit they used climate change protests as an excuse to skip class

More than 300,000 people have flocked to climate change rallies in 110 towns and cities across Australia, calling for governments and businesses to act immediately. The Global Strike 4 Climate, held across the world on Friday, was the biggest climate mobilisation in Australia's history, with more than double the turnout of the March protest. A whopping 100,000 protesters flooded the streets in Melbourne, while Sydney saw 80,000 people march through the CBD to the Domain.

SOTT FOCUS: Objective:Health: #31 - The Vaping Crisis - They're Coming For Your Vapes!

SOTT FOCUS: Objective:Health: #31 - The Vaping Crisis - They're Coming For Your Vapes!

Across the US, hundreds of people have come down with a severe and mysterious respiratory illness that seems to be linked to vaping the act of inhaling vapor produced by a vaporizer or electronic cigarette which has surged in popularity in recent years. The FDA announced a criminal probe into vaping as the number of reported cases of lung illnesses linked to the practice rose to 530. Some states and cities have already banned flavoured vape products, with Trump talking about a nation wide ban. But are the bans necessary? Researchers have yet to figure out what about vaping is causing these issues. Vaping has been around for over a decade, yet only now are people coming down with this condition. Is this reactionary nanny-state solution really warranted? Join us on this episode of Objective:Health as we dig deep into this latest panic gripping the US. And check us out on Brighteon! For other health-related news and more, you can find us on: ♥Twitter: https://twitter.com/objecthealth...

Brexit: Jean-Claude Juncker denies 'erotic relationship' with Irish backstop

Brexit: Jean-Claude Juncker denies 'erotic relationship' with Irish backstop

JEAN-Claude Juncker has bizarrely said he did not have an "erotic relationship" with the Irish backstop - as he declared "we can have a deal". In an apparent change of heart, the EU Commission president declared for the first time he was willing to scrap the controversial backstop which critics fear will keep Britain tied to EU regulations. Calling his lunch with Boris Johnson in Luxembourg on Monday as "a rather positive meeting", Mr Juncker told Sky News: "We can have a deal." Asked if the chances were more than 50-50, he added: "I don't know. But I'm doing everything to have a deal, because I don't like the idea of a No Deal."

Western NGO Action Against Hunger booted out of Nigeria after it's caught FEEDING Boko Haram terrorists

Western NGO Action Against Hunger booted out of Nigeria after it's caught FEEDING Boko Haram terrorists

The Nigerian Army, operating in the country's besieged northeast, has shut the offices of NGO Action Against Hunger (AAH). The group is accused of aiding terrorist groups such as Boko Haram and Islamic State (IS, formerly ISIS). AAH ignored repeated warnings to cease "aiding and abetting terrorist groups" by supplying them with food and medicine, Colonel Ado Isa, deputy director of army public relations, said, as the staff were ordered by soldiers to close the main office in Maiduguri, Borno State. "The subversive... actions of the NGO Action Against Hunger persisted despite several warnings to desist from aiding and abetting terrorists and their atrocities," Isa said in a statement on Thursday. He added that the group has been declared an entity "non-grata."

'Fireball' meteor lights up skies over Tasmania and Victoria

'Fireball' meteor lights up skies over Tasmania and Victoria

A fireball meteor — possibly as small as a tennis ball — has burst into the Earth's atmosphere causing a flash of light and a sound "like thunder" over Tasmania and Victoria, causing some to fear the worst. The object flew across the horizon just before 8:30pm (AEST), with videos being shared by excited eyewitnesses in both states. Adrian from Mole Creek said he saw a vivid light and heard what "sounded like thunder". "I was outside and it was all nice and dark and suddenly the backyard lit up, like a helicopter going over with a spotlight, quite low," he said. Dominic McAlinden said he covered his ears, expecting an explosion. "Night turned to day, and a blue-and-white streak turned red and orange as it burnt up," he said. Victor was behind the wheel on the Bass Highway in northern Tasmania when "just out of the corner of my eye to the east I saw what appeared to be like a skyrocket shooting down to the ground". Hazel, in Penguin on the northern Tasmania coast said "it lit the...

BEST OF THE WEB: Jordan Peterson enters rehab after wife's cancer diagnosis

BEST OF THE WEB: Jordan Peterson enters rehab after wife's cancer diagnosis

Jordan Peterson, the Canadian psychologist and anti-political-correctness crusader, has checked himself in to rehab in New York, his daughter has revealed. The "12 Rules for Life" author has sought help trying to get off the anti-anxiety drug clonazepam, his daughter Mikhaila Peterson said in a video posted to her YouTube account Thursday. "I've never seen my dad like this," the 27-year-old diet blogger said in the eight-and-a-half-minute video. "He's having a miserable time of it. It breaks my heart." The elder Peterson, 57, began taking the addictive medication to deal with stress from his wife's battle with cancer and other health problems earlier this year, his daughter said. He tried to quit cold-turkey over the summer after his wife, Tammy Roberts, "miraculously" recovered from complications with a kidney surgery, Mikhaila said.

Twitter purges hundreds of accounts from Egypt & UAE for 'pro-Saudi messaging' that targeted IRAN & QATAR

Twitter purges hundreds of accounts from Egypt & UAE for 'pro-Saudi messaging' that targeted IRAN & QATAR

Twitter has permanently banned nearly three hundred accounts based in Egypt and the United Arab Emirates, citing "platform manipulation" which boosted support for the Saudi government and "targeted" countries like Iran and Qatar. The latest purge was announced in a blog post on Friday, stating the company had removed a "network of 273 accounts" for coordinated and suspicious activity. "These accounts were interconnected in their goals and tactics: a multi-faceted information operation primarily targeting Qatar, and other countries such as Iran," the blog post said, adding "It also amplified messaging supportive of the Saudi government." The company said it found evidence that a software firm based in Abu Dhabi, DotDev, managed the operation, and that it had banned all accounts associated with the tech firm.

Driving without breaking any laws is 'suspicious' assertion in the US shot down by court!

Driving without breaking any laws is 'suspicious' assertion in the US shot down by court!

Must be tough out there for cops. Literally everything is suspicious. And there are only so many hours in the day. Since no court is willing to end the tradition of pretextual stops, anything that can be described as suspicious has been used to initiate fishing expeditions. A few courts have called out this tendency to view almost everything humans do as indicative of criminal behavior. This is one of the better call-outs, as it gives some indication of just how many "training and experience" assertions the court has had to wade through while dealing with law enforcement assertions about reasonable suspicion. A logical reasoning sequence based upon some "training and experience" — because drug traffickers have been seen breathing, then breathing is an indicia of drug trafficking. Because they normally have two hands, then having two hands is an indicia of drug smuggling. Silly — maybe, but one can wonder if that is the direction we are heading. Whether it be driving a clean...

UK rapper blasted for brandishing fake severed head of BoJo at awards ceremony

UK rapper blasted for brandishing fake severed head of BoJo at awards ceremony

A British rapper's 'tasteless' publicity stunt has been lambasted on social media, after he waved a fake severed head of Prime Minister Boris Johnson during an award show. The 24-year-old rapper slowthai, whose real name is Tyron Frampton, ended his performance at the Mercury Prize ceremony in London on Thursday night by pulling out a mock-up decapitated head of PM Johnson. "F**k Boris Johnson! F**k everything!" he shouted on stage while waving the head. The rapper also screamed: "And there ain't nothing great about Britain," referring to the name of his debut album, 'Nothing Great About Britain.' He did all this while wearing a "F**k Boris" T-shirt - an item he sells through his online store.

Huawei Mate 30 Pro ditches Google Apps, keeps Android - Why it matters

Huawei Mate 30 Pro ditches Google Apps, keeps Android - Why it matters

Can Huawei make great phones without the full power of Google's Android operating system behind it? We're about to find out. The Chinese giant on Thursday unveiled the Mate 30 and Mate 30 Pro, its latest flagship phones, at an event in Munich. The phones will ship with state-of-the-art hardware, including four rear cameras, but without full Android support. The Mate 30 phones are based on Android open source, meaning they will still function like Androids. What they won't have, though, is Google services or apps. No Google Maps, no Google Chrome and, most importantly, no Google Play Store. Instead, you'll surf the web through the Huawei Browser and download apps through the Huawei AppGallery. The AppGallery has around 45,000 apps, according to Huawei, compared to the Google Play Store's estimated 2.7 million. Google typically licenses the latest version of Android, currently Android 10, for phone manufacturers to use. The Mate 30 phones will instead be powered by open-source...

America's legacy: Bodies of dead Iraqi kids radioactive from US depleted uranium

America's legacy: Bodies of dead Iraqi kids radioactive from US depleted uranium

By examining bodies of dead Iraqi children who had congenital birth defects, researchers have proven their conditions were directly related to US bombardment of the country with depleted uranium rounds early in the Iraq War and stores at US bases during the subsequent occupation. A new study has drawn direct links between the US military's use of depleted uranium in the Iraq War and congenital birth defects suffered by Iraqi children. Researchers examined the hair and baby teeth of dead Iraqi children near areas of heavy fighting as well as US military bases and found the radioactive element thorium - a telltale sign of uranium of the type used to make depleted uranium rounds. Depleted uranium is a byproduct of the industrial process used to refine uranium-238 into U-235, which is more suitable for fuel in nuclear power plants. Composed of U-238 that cannot have further U-235 extracted from it, the matter is extremely dense - twice as dense as lead - and when fused with other...

Peacemaker? Saving face? Trump claims attacking Iran is too 'easy'; restraint is his 'sign of strength'

Peacemaker? Saving face? Trump claims attacking Iran is too 'easy'; restraint is his 'sign of strength'

As American and Saudi Arabian officials blame Iran for attacking Saudi oil refineries, President Donald Trump has remained noncommittal about a US response, calling his prior restraint a "sign of strength." Speaking to reporters in Los Angeles on Wednesday, the US president said that he would outline new sanctions on Iran within 48 hours, after announcing them via Twitter earlier in the day. While it would be "very easy" to attack Iran, his reluctance to do so is "a sign of strength," Trump added. That statement echoed his reply on Tuesday to Senator Lindsey Graham (R-South Carolina), who called Trump's cancelation of military strikes on Iran in June a "sign of weakness." Graham, the former wingman of the hawkish Senator John McCain, has emerged as one of the loudest proponents of retaliatory strikes in recent days, declaring the oil refinery attack an "act of war," and calling for an "unequivocal" response. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo also described the attack as an "act of...

Houthi attack on Saudi oil facility proves Turkey's S-400 purchase was the right choice

Houthi attack on Saudi oil facility proves Turkey's S-400 purchase was the right choice

September 14 would prove to be a major wake up call for Saudi Arabia, the world's largest exporter and producer of oil in the world, as its daily supply was cut by nearly 50 percent because of drone and missile attacks against state-owned oil company, Aramco. The attack by the Yemeni Shi'ite Houthi-led Ansarullah movement was so powerful that on the September 17, the Saudi Energy Minister announced the use of oil reserves to offset some of the market demand. Oil prices skyrocketed on September 16 on stock exchanges around the world after the reduction of production was announced at 5.7 million barrels per day. The attack against oil fields in Saudi Arabia threatens to add a considerable risk premium to the price of crude oil, especially with production in the Kingdom already halved. The worst-case scenario would see prices rise to $100 per barrel. The perennial rise in oil prices is capable of affecting business activity and consumer confidence, as well as threaten to slow global...